The “Total Pratt Knot” (knecktie)

I dub thee: The Total Pratt Knot


Since I consider this is closer in affect to the Pratt than the Half-Windsor why should it be called the co-half-windsor
Notice how my 1337 photoshop skills

The co-half-windsor ( Li Ro Ci Ro Li Co T ) is the cousin to the Half-Windsor knot ( Li Ro Ci Lo Ri Co T ). In swapping two moves it remains similar in that it is tied right side out and absurdly considered “mathematically” asymmetrical (same number of L and R moves), but different in that it is visually symmetrical, self-releasing… and completely dismissed everywhere. I believe the visual symmetry is achieved through the obvious symmetry around the first Centring move – Li Ro Ci Ro Li  – nearest the center are Ro moves on either side, followed by Li moves. Note that all knots end with “Co T” (some do have extra loops and are written “Co T T” or even “Co T T T” ) and so that doesn’t affect symmetry (except that it actually does  – the final Co creates visually balancing “ear” on the left (skinny) side of this knot).  Also interesting (and wrong) is that Fink considers that the half windsor to have a balance of 0 (number of times the running part switches from clockwise to counterclockwise or vice versa) and the co-half-windsor to be 1 – this is clearly backwards as the co-half-windsor only moves counterclockwise and never reverses.  

Sadly there are no pictures or diagrams of the co-half-windsor and we have to settle for diagrams of the half-windsor – which in my opinion is an entirely different knot:

image.png

The capital letter denotes where the running end moves to –  Left, Right, or Center (between the both the running end standing parts hanging down from the neck) .  The lower case letter denotes if the movement goes Into (i) the page or Out (o) the page.  That’s part is just dumb – it’s backwards unless your are looking at a book. Over (o) or Under (u)  would make more sense to me – works if it’s on a page, in the mirror, or… wait for it… hanging around your neck! Rewriting the co-half-windsor with over or under notation and putting the Over/Under instruction first (as you might speak it) looks like  this: 

oL uR oC uR oL uC T

And would be verbally stated as:

First move the fat part of the tie OVER the LEFT part (oL)

Next move the fat part of the tie UNDER the RIGHT part (uL)

Next move the fat part of the tie OVER the CENTER of the knot (oC)

Next move the fat part of the tie UNDER the RIGHT part (uR)

Next move the fat part of the tie OVER the LEFT part (oL)

Next move the fat part of the tie UNDER the CENTER

Last move the fat part of the tie THROUGH the loop

I often think this might be similar to the “Pratt Knot” / “Shelby Knot” ( Lo Ci Lo Ri Co T ) or the “Nicky Knot” ( Lo Ci Ro Li Co T ).  It is definitely not like the four-in-hand knot ( Li Ro Li Co T ). 

This cousin of the half-Windsor has the advantage of self-releasing (unknotting) when the thin end is pulled out through the knot.

http://www.tcm.phy.cam.ac.uk/~tmf20/tieknots.shtml

7     Li Ro Ci Lo Ri Co T     half-Windsor

If a man claims to know a second knot in addition to the four-in-hand, it is likely to be the half-Windsor, the third of the four classic tie knots. This symmetric knot is medium-sized, with the silhouette of an equilateral triangle. It can satisfactorily be worn with collars of most sizes and spreads. Although the name of the half-Windsor suggests it is derived from the Windsor, there is little direct evidence for this claim. Moreover, the half-Windsor is not half the size of the Windsor, but rather three-quarters.

Keep in mind that the half-Windsor is sometimes a victim of the erroneous naming convention used to describe both it and the Windsor, calling them the Windsor and double-Windsor. There is no such thing as a double Windsor, and the Windsor should be used to refer to knot 31 only.

http://www.tcm.phy.cam.ac.uk/~tmf20/tieknots.shtml

COMPREHENSIVE LIST OF KNOTS

Here is a list of all possible knots, regardless of their aesthetic value. The columns are as follows:

  • Number is the number of the knot, and, along with any subscripts or superscripts, a unique identifier (e.g., FM7 is the half-Windsor, where FM refers to the Fink-Mao notation). Knots are ordered first by size, then by the number of centre moves C, then by symmetry s, then by balance b.
  • Size is the number of moves, not including T. Higher values correspond to bigger knots.
  • Centres is the number of centre moves C. Higher values correspond to broader knots.
  • Sequence   The instructions for tying the knot, using the notation described at the top of this page.
  • Symmetry (s) is the absolute value of the difference between the number of R and L moves.
  • Balance (b) is the number of times the winding of the wide blade switches from clockwise to counter-clockwise, or vice-versa.
  • Knotted status (k)   Whether, when the tie is removed over the head and the thin end pulled out of the knot, a knot remains (y) or does not (n). If a knot remains, it is said to be not self-releasing; if no knot remains, it is said to be self-releasing.
  • Name   Standard name of the knot.
  • 3on   The subscript on is short for Onassis, and it indicates his particular style of bring the wide blade behind and through the center after tying a four-in-hand. This variation can be applied to any knot but the results are all much the same.
  • 32, 62, etc.   If a knot ends with two Ts, it is subscripted 2; if three Ts, it is subscripted 3; and so on.
  • 32r, etc.   The superscript r means the tie is worn in reverse, that is, back-to-front. While this is of course possible for any knot, with some it gives unusual and pleasant results. The tie itself should be reversed before tying.
No.    SizeCen.  Sequences    b    k      Name
131Lo Ri Co T00yOriental
 
241Li Ro Li Co T11nfour-in-hand
2on41Li Ro Li Co T Ri Co11Onassis
 
351Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T02yKelvin
3251Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T02cross Kelvin
32r51Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T02diagonal
452Lo Ci Ro Li Co T10nNicky
552Lo Ci Lo Ri Co T11yPratt
 
661Li Ro Li Ro Li Co T13nVictoria
6261Li Ro Li Ro Li Co T T13cross Victoria
762Li Ro Ci Lo Ri Co T00yhalf-Windsor
862Li Ro Ci Ro Li Co T01nco-half-Windsor
962Li Co Ri Lo Ri Co T01y
1062Li Co Li Ro Li Co T22n
 
1171Lo Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T04y
11271Lo Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T04
11371Lo Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T T04
1272Lo Ri Lo Ci Ro Li Co T11nSt Andrew
1372Lo Ri Co Li Ro Li Co T11n
1472Lo Ri Lo Ci Lo Ri Co T12yco-St Andrew
1572Lo Ri Co Ri Lo Ri Co T12y
1672Lo Ci Ro Li Ro Li Co T12n
16272Lo Ci Ro Li Ro Li Co T T12
1772Lo Ci Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T13y
17272Lo Ci Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T13
1873Lo Ci Ro Ci Lo Ri Co T01yPlattsburgh
1973Lo Ci Ro Ci Ro Li Co T02nco-Plattsburgh
2073Lo Ci Lo Ci Ro Li Co T22n
2173Lo Ci Lo Ci Lo Ri Co T23y
 
2281Li Ro Li Ro Li Ro Li Co T15n
22281Li Ro Li Ro Li Ro Li Co T T15
22381Li Ro Li Ro Li Ro Li Co T T T15
2382Li Ro Li Co Ri Lo Ri Co T02yCavendish
2482Li Ro Li Ro Ci Lo Ri Co T02y
2582Li Ro Ci Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T02y
25282Li Ro Ci Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T02Christensen
2682Li Ro Li Ro Ci Ro Li Co T03n
2782Li Ro Ci Ro Li Ro Li Co T03n
27282Li Ro Ci Ro Li Ro Li Co T T03co-Christensen
2882Li Co Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T03y
28282Li Co Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T03
2982Li Ro Li Co Li Ro Li Co T23n
3082Li Co Li Ro Li Ro Li Co T24n
30282Li Co Li Ro Li Ro Li Co T T24
3183Li Co Ri Lo Ci Ro Li Co T10nWindsor
3283Li Co Li Ro Ci Lo Ri Co T11yco-Windsor 1
3383Li Co Ri Lo Ci Lo Ri Co T11yco-Windsor 2
3483Li Ro Ci Lo Ci Ro Li Co T11n
3583Li Co Li Ro Ci Ro Li Co T12nco-Windsor 3
3682Li Ro Ci Ro Ci Lo Ri Co T12y
3783Li Ro Ci Lo Ci Lo Ri Co T12y
3883Li Co Ri Co Li Ro Li Co T12n
3983Li Ro Ci Ro Ci Ro Li Co T13n
4083Li Co Li Co Ri Lo Ri Co T13y
4183Li Co Ri Co Ri Lo Ri Co T13y
4283Li Co Li Co Li Ro Li Co T34n
 
4391Lo Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T06y
43291Lo Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T06
43391Lo Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T T06
43491Lo Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T T T06
4492Lo Ri Lo Ri Co Li Ro Li Co T13nGranchester
4592Lo Ri Lo Ci Ro Li Ro Li Co T13n
45292Lo Ri Lo Ci Ro Li Ro Li Co T T13
4692Lo Ri Lo Ri Lo Ci Ro Li Co T13n
4792Lo Ri Co Li Ro Li Ro Li Co T13n
47292Lo Ri Co Li Ro Li Ro Li Co T T13
4892Lo Ri Lo Ri Co Ri Lo Ri Co T14yco-Grantchester
4992Lo Ri Lo Ci Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T14y
49292Lo Ri Lo Ci Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T14
5092Lo Ri Lo Ri Lo Ci Lo Ri Co T14y
5192Lo Ri Co Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T14y
51292Lo Ri Co Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T14
5292Lo Ci Ro Li Ro Li Ro Li Co T14n
52292Lo Ci Ro Li Ro Li Ro Li Co T T14
52392Lo Ci Ro Li Ro Li Ro Li Co T T T14
5392Lo Ci Lo Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T15y
53292Lo Ci Lo Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T15
53392Lo Ci Lo Ri Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T T15
5493Lo Ri Co Li Ro Ci Lo Ri Co T00yHanover
5593Lo Ri Co Ri Lo Ci Ro Li Co T01nco-Hanover 1
5693Lo Ri Co Li Ro Ci Ro Li Co T01nco-Hanover 2
5793Lo Ci Ro Li Ro Ci Lo Ri Co T01y
5893Lo Ci Ro Li Co Ri Lo Ri Co T01yco-Hanover 3
5993Lo Ri Co Ri Lo Ci Lo Ri Co T02y
6093Lo Ci Ro Li Ro Ci Ro Li Co T02n
6193Lo Ri Lo Ci Ro Ci Lo Ri Co T02y
6293Lo Ri Co Li Co Ri Lo Ri Co T02y
6393Lo Ri Lo Ci Ro Ci Ro Li Co T03n
6493Lo Ri Co Ri Co Li Ro Li Co T03n
6593Lo Ci Lo Ri Co Ri Lo Ri Co T03y
6693Lo Ci Ro Ci Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T03y
66293Lo Ci Ro Ci Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T03
6793Lo Ci Ro Ci Ro Li Ro Li Co T04n
67293Lo Ci Ro Ci Ro Li Ro Li Co T T04
6893Lo Ci Lo Ri Lo Ci Ro Li Co T22n
6993Lo Ci Lo Ri Co Li Ro Li Co T22n
7093Lo Ci Ro Li Co Li Ro Li Co T22n
7193Lo Ci Lo Ri Lo Ci Lo Ri Co T23y
7293Lo Ri Lo Ci Lo Ci Ro Li Co T23n
7393Lo Ri Co Li Co Li Ro Li Co T23n
7493Lo Ri Lo Ci Lo Ci Lo Ri Co T24y
7593Lo Ri Co Ri Co Ri Lo Ri Co T24y
7693Lo Ci Lo Ci Ro Li Ro Li Co T24n
76293Lo Ci Lo Ci Ro Li Ro Li Co T T24
7793Lo Ci Lo Ci Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T25y
77293Lo Ci Lo Ci Lo Ri Lo Ri Co T T25
7894Lo Ci Ro Ci Lo Ci Ro Li Co T12nBalthus
7994Lo Ci Lo Ci Ro Ci Lo Ri Co T13y
8094Lo Ci Ro Ci Ro Ci Lo Ri Co T13y
8194Lo Ci Ro Ci Lo Ci Lo Ri Co T13yco-Balthus
8294Lo Ci Lo Ci Ro Ci Ro Li Co T14n
8394Lo Ci Ro Ci Ro Ci Ro Li Co T14n
8494Lo Ci Lo Ci Lo Ci Ro Li Co T34n
8594Lo Ci Lo Ci Lo Ci Lo Ri Co T35y

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Non-Newtonian fluids

It helps to know what a Newtonian fluid is before you start thinking about non-Newtonian fluids.  Conveniently, just about every fluid you can think of is Newtonian.  When you push on a fluid, it moves out of the way.  Some move fast, some move slow (this is quantified as viscosity), but when a fluid seizes up and stops,,when it becomes like a solid in response… That goes against Newton!

Obleck bounding on a speaker
Non-Newtowning fluids are better with food coloring

Perhaps the most common non Newtonian fluid people run across [foreshadowing] is cornstarch and water. It’s used to thicken gravy and other sauces (because of viscosity). But when making gravy, you are cautioned to mix the corn starch in cold water first and then add that to your hot liquid that needs to be thickened to avoid clumps. This is because the corn starch on the outside will mix with water first and be agitated (pressed on) by the hot liquid and turn solid, preventing even distribution of the inner cornstarch. But if you mix it with child water first all of the corn starch will be able to mix with the hot water.

5 kids mixing conrstarch and water by hand in a 15 gallon bucket
A hands-on experience

So we mixed it 50lbs bag of corn starch with water, and learned that if you put water into cornstarch it will mix on the surface, and further attempts to mix in more water will cause the outer cornstarch solution to turn solid. Preventing further mixing…. Much like cornstarch dumped directly into hot water. The right way to mix large batches is to add the corn starch slowly into water until the desired thickness is achieved.

You can then put that on a speaker and play a time of just the right frequency to see the corn starch turn solid, be thrown in the air and turn liquid again on the way down

Or you can jump in a big tub of it and see if you can start running before you begin to sink. It’s harder than it looks.

Or you can cut to the chase and just build a trough that you can run across… Or stop and sink into.

Making liquid dance on a speaker is pretty cool, and visually memorizing, but hands on (or feet in) is really the best way to experience and believe in the properties of Non Newtonian fluids.

kids gather around and playing with obleck in a speaker

No matter what you do though, make sure you leave lots of time for cleanup.

Solar Eclipse in Clemson

Enlarge Cereal Box Solar Eclipse viewer
Joshua’s solar eclipse viewer

We travelled to Clemson for the total solar eclipse. We threw a few simple, random building materials I the car as we we’re heading out. And when we got there we had a little bit of time… So we made a cereal box viewer, sans the cereal box… And way better. Josh gave lots of demos and explained how it worked and some of the more interesting properties. So much so that we were interviewed for and included in a book!

One of the neat things about the book was that Marie Harris, one of our favorite librarians from “The Loft” (a cool teen only space at Imaginon – the Children’s Library) in Charlotte – send me an email after she read the book. We’re quoted talking about Baily’s Beads which was truly the most amazing thing that I got to see being in totality.

Rugby

Brian makes three great tackles in a row while injured.

Brian (gray sleeves, red socks) is injured at the start of this play (on the ground protecting his head). He’s trying to get get subbed off the field… but the play comes his way. So he does the only thing he can think to do – he makes the tackle. And then he does it again and again. The play finally moves away from him and he can limp away… but he keeps checking to make sure his team doesn’t need him. Fortunately his injuries were temporary and he was able to rejoin the game after a short break.

Rugby Tackle
Brian in hot pursuit from a lineout on the far side of the pitch.

Life U Rugby Camp

Rugby tackle
Brian makes a tackle a the the Life University summer rugby camp.

Playing rugby at the Life University rugby camp. It’s unthinkable that so few kids know about the Life camp. The best college players in the country (many from outside the US) run a week long overnight clinic for high school kids. There is just not a better place to have a clinic.

Las Vegas Sevens

Kids playing rugby - white player running with ball with green player in pursuit
Brian running for a try at the Vegas Sevens

Every year the Rugby world lays siege to every hotel and parking space in Las Vegas. Rugby Sevens is the fast past version – 7 minute half, 7 a side, of the regular version. The national teams from around the world play in the evening and the middle school through college kids play during the day.